How to Spot a Cryptocurrency Scam

Whenever you see red flags, it’s best to stay away and not get involved. How do you detect so-called red flags? Most often than not, it’s a gut feeling that something is not right or something is off. That’s all great, you might say, but what if you don’t have very good intuition. If that’s the case we’ve put together a list of signs you can watch out for. 

Exaggerated claims or guaranteed payouts. Unfortunately, there’s no such thing as a “guaranteed” payout in most kinds of investments. There’s always the risk of losing. In fact, out of every 10 trades, only one or two of them turn out to be winners. Some investors do get lucky, but they account for less than 1% of the population. To put into perspective, if someone assures you of winning the lottery, you’re pretty sure the game is rigged or the person is a scammer.

Nonexistent businesses or fake photos of their premises. Investment scams are easily caught when doing a fact-check on their base of operations and business offices – you won’t find any. That alone tells you they don’t want to be found by people asking for their money when the scam blows up.

A lot of unverified facts and/or shady past:. Doing a fact-check on these people behind the scams can also raise a red flag. It’s either they don’t exist or they have a previous history of scamming other people and being involved in one of their elaborate displays of opulence and extravaganzas. Remember their names and steer clear from anything that has to do with them.

You see a lot of complaints when you Google search. Scammers are cleverer these days, using the word “scam” as one of their SEO keywords to trick people into clicking these links to know if they really are. Instead, they end up going to one of their landing pages or paid reviews and articles promoting their company or explaining why they are not a scam. This might not always be true with all companies and cryptocurrencies that has the word “scam” in search suggestions, but suffice to say, scammers are using this tactic to get people involved.

Tech-savvy investors can turn the tables on these scammers by using the same tool they trick people with – the Internet. Research and cryptocurrency education are your best allies to thrive in today’s technology-driven world.

That said, we’ll end this blog post with a cryptocurrency investment “hall of shame.” These are companies that have unfortunately scammed people of their money and disappear with the profits.

The Hall of Shame

Gladiacoin – founded in November 26, 2016, this ponzi scheme promised to double Bitcoin in 90 days, which include 2.2% payout dividend. It folded on June 2017 with investors losing millions of dollars. Gladiacoin can no longer be reached in their now-defunct website https://www.gladiacoin.com/. Their coin was never listed in Coinmarketcap.

Onecoin a ponzi scheme which promoted a cryptocurrency with a “private blockchain” and run by people who have been previously involved in these shady investment scams. Authorities began shutting down Onecoin’s offshore offices in 2017 and have people arrested and filed appropriate charges to perpetrators, including the CEO.

Bitconnect generally regarded as a pump-and-dump and ponzi scheme for its high-yield investment program. It reached an all-time high when it was listed as one of the top 20 cryptocurrencies in Coinmarketcap at $460 apiece, and folded in January 2018 at only $5.92. Thousands have lost their savings, retirements, and are now in huge debts for buying cryptocurrencies which is now a little more (or less) than a dollar. It is now ranked 554 in Coinmarketcap at $0.9 apiece.